17 Substitutions Down/Up Thirds TBk2

Do you want to go beyond what is in the chorusbook, hymnbook, or Internet? Then this chapter is for you!  Substitutions up/down a third can add smoothness, warmth, and richness to your songs/arrangements.

Our task is to substitute (replace) a single given chord with another. We’ll be working with chord replacement, not chord progressions, though progressions could be a secondary result.

Updated 11.2013. 15 pages, 38 examples.

To download, see download sign, bottom-left corner.

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16 Progressions Down a Fifth—Building Up TBk2

Do you feel that worship choruses often sound bland harmonically?  Progressions down a fifth can create not only harmonic interest but harmonic strength. They have a strong, forward movement.  Progressions down a fifth are often launched with a iii or vi chord.  For example, iii – vi – ii – V – I.  Learn how to do it.

Extensions (9ths, 13ths, etc) can be added to the basic chords giving them nuanced color. Introducing chord substitutions, such as the use of half-diminished chords, into the sequence can also have a dramatic effect. This chapter provides over fifty illustrations and exercises to help you integrate the concepts into your style of playing while using hymns and worship choruses.

To download, see download sign, bottom-left corner.

Updated 2.2014.  24 pages, 54 examples.

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15 Creating Drones/Pedals – Simplifying TBk2

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Pedals/drones occur frequently in worship music/bands today (ala U2 band).  The guitars hangs onto one chord (D5–open fifth) while the bass moves. Or, the bass remains stationary while the guitars move. Simple, effective, easy to play. Discussion, examples, assignments.

13 Creating Hymn Charts – Simplifying TBk2

Creating hymn charts for worship sets.  Task: limit chords to 1 or 2 per measure (otherwise guitars lose flow). Big guitar problem with hymn books: there are often four chords per measure.  Guitarists have preference for sharp keys. Find in this chapter some easy, some difficult assignments.

To download, see sign at bottom-left corner.  Updated 6.2014. 25 pages, 33 examples.

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14 Finding the Right Key TBk2

High-profile, worship leaders today are tenors with spectacular upper ranges. Their CDs pitch songs in high keys suited to their voices, not the congregation’s. Let’s find the congregation’s key.  What keys are best for guitarists?  Are there potential problems with any of these guitar-preferred keys?

To download, see download sign, bottom-left corner.

Updated 2014. 7 pages, 14 examples.

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